Even the dead Facebook.” ~ Dave Lucasaaadead

As creepy as it has become, Facebook is the 2017 equivalent to the blog, on a much wider per-capita basis. According to Google, (and this is from 4 years ago): “Based on the site’s growth rate, and the age breakdown of their users over time, there are probably 10 to 20 million people who created Facebook profiles who have since died…. About 290,000 US Facebook users will die (or have died) in 2013.” Bloggers die too!

By way of The New York Times: “Facebook is among several online services that allows a designated person to take control of a deceased person’s account.” Dead or alive, would you really want someone else controlling your account?

But those among us who yearn for immortality might prefer to maintain an active digital presence long after we have left the planet.

For instance, as I addressed this dilemma several years ago, “Should bloggers pre-post articles way ahead of time? Assuming the blogger or wordpress or whatever system didn’t get corrupted or otherwise fail, bloggers could be dispensing advice and anecdotes to readers (and relatives & their descendants) for years after they’ve departed this mortal coil.”

Likewise with other social media platforms. You can write articles, stories, tweets, etc. and schedule them to be released at specific future dates. You’re almost IMMORTAL! Think about THAT!

“It’s a grim thought, but like writing a last will and testament, this has become just another part of death preparation.” Ah, again the Times injects common sense into the dreamscape.

Do we have a social responsibility to leave such a digital legacy? Imagine your own son or daughter reading dear dead Dad or Mom’s blog or tweet 10, 15, 20 years after they’ve passed away? “This may be a rough time in your life. Or maybe not. I hope you are happy! I want to tell you a story about… blah blah blah.”

And if a netizen should leave such articles behind, would readers, family members, descendants feel an obligation to read them or a sense of guilt if they didn’t?

Like those who prefer to write their own obituaries, with a little foresight and planning, you can begin writing and uploading future works for the masses. You just want to make certain that things you write will stay relevant over the passage of time. If you watch re-runs of the old Laugh-In TV series, each episode has a skit entitled “News from the future.” It usually starts out “20 years from now, in 1988…” You’ll immediately understand why you can’t use current entertainment and pop culture as any sort of foundation for future writings. Think like Hemingway or Shelley or Shakespeare. Pass along advice or tell stories that transcend time. You may be long dead and gone, but you’ll be more in the public consciousness than any of the cryobabies

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Did I type “as the new year begins?”
Indeed I did!
September.
The new school year.
The new fall TV season.
The time when 2017 model cars come out.
I don’t know about you, but I had a really really good summer 2016! It started back in May for me.
I set a goal of having a great summer, writing down all the things I wanted to do, big and small, and then taking each day as it came, enjoying it whether at home, at work, or at play. I hope YOU had a great summer too!

This blog has been inactive for some time. Where did those 8 months go? Other social media and the time constraints of having a kick-ass summer prohibited me from taking the time to write and publish worthwhile material here. In fact, save for this paragraph, I’m trying out a twitter app called “TwitLonger” that lets you ramble on beyond 140 characters. Now that Autumn is approaching I believe I’ll have more time to get online in the late evening and carry on with serious blogging.

Fall should be really interesting: the presidential election in the United States between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is certainly going to be one for the record books. A political donnybrook if ever there was one, I suspect! I hope YOU continue to follow me on social media, read my blogs and of course if you’re in upstate New York – actually anywhere on earth – you can listen to my news reports via the internet on WAMC.org

It’s “the first known major media outlet to launch a version of its site
that runs as a ‘hidden service’ on the Tor network, the anonymity
system that powers the thousands of untraceable websites that are
sometimes known as the darknet or dark web. “

On Wednesday, ProPublica became the first known major media outlet to launch a version of its site that runs as a “hidden service” on the Tor network. Facebook launched its own dark web version in 2014. You can set up your own site if you wish.

According to wired.com, ProPublica first began considering launching a hidden service last year when the news site was working on a report about Chinese online censorship and wanted to make sure the reporting was itself safe to visit for Chinese readers. Like other news sites, ProPublica also accepts
anonymous tips and leaks through its SecureDrop server, another Tor hidden service.

The move, ProPublica says, is designed to offer the best possible privacy protections for its visitors seeking to read the site’s news with their anonymity fully intact. TNW news: “ProPublica is a standalone non-profit newsroom that prizes itself on producing independent investigative journalism that’s in the public interest, so it will be interesting to see if it can take this mission further under the cover of the Dark Web.”

Unlike mere SSL encryption, which hides the content of the site a web visitor is accessing, the Tor hidden service would ensure that even the fact that the reader visited ProPublica’s website would be hidden from an eavesdropper or Internet service provider.” (Wired)

Onion GuideOnionshop Guide: How to set up a hidden service?

https://www.scribd.com/embeds/260099551/content?start_page=1&view_mode=scroll&show_recommendations=true

The page is about to turn on our calendar. Looking back, I had a darned good 2015. Better than a long stretch of previous years.

Now I have in place, written down, a 5-year plan in which I have outlined specific goals. And I believe I have what it takes to accomplish them.  Of course those three amigos, luck, fortune and circumstance will likely help determine how rocky or smooth the road ahead will be.

Happy New Year!

 

 

Kaavya Viswanathan was a Harvard sophomore who was featured in the New York Times for her book How Opal Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild and Got a Life, and then again when it was discovered that she plagiarized portions of the novel from two books by Megan McCafferty. Viswanathan apologized, saying that she was a “huge fan” of the books when she was in high school and that she “wasn’t aware of how much [she] may have internalized Ms. McCafferty’s words.”

Martinelli’s list of free plagiarism checkers has been one of IJNet’s most popular articles across all languages. It’s clear readers want to avoid the pitfalls of plagiarism, so they’ve updated the post with four of the best free online plagiarism checkers available to anyone, revised for 2015!

Click here for the full story!

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Just in time for fall. @thespot518 Possibly filling the void left when Metroland stopped.

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